Influence of Industrialism on Arts

Engineering, technology, and industrialization have made our lives much better. There is no doubt about that. They have transformed our society and for better or worse, they have also changed the way we perceive and admire Arts and Artisan’s efforts around us. But, to what extent?

Everything that modern man uses has been manufactured en masse and Information technology have made Earth a global village. People can interact with each other thousands of miles away in sub-seconds and travel around the world in a matter of hours. So, they have a faster and direct access to what is being expressed in the form of art and literature. That has changed things a lot too.

There were some art forms that were transformed with the advent of modern machines. Camera photography gave people the unprecedented ability to capture any moment instantaneously. When photography was invented in 1830, painters felt threatened by the new invention. They eventually distinguished Arts form from Photography and began to experiment with impressionism, abstract arts, surrealism and other forms of modern painting concepts that were partly fueled by industrialism and the new social settings in an industrial world. Another significant impact of the Industrial and Information Revolutions was the invention of products like the tube paint. As tube paints are collapsible, their invention made artists more mobile. It resulted in a better outreach of art.

With the advent of photographs and movie reels, a different art category emerged that has since overshadowed the rest in terms of popularity and mass appeal. It is the art of motion pictures and animation. It is the simplicity and mass appeal of this relatively new sensation that transcended all boundaries and made us fall in love with it. Now you didn’t need to understand a particular art form to be able to admire it. It also resulted in a decreased interest in other forms of expressive art.

The internet and communication revolution also brought a lot of changes into our lives and eliminated many boundaries. Recently, various art forms have thrived due to this increased connectivity and brought fame to artists from around the world. They have become richer and more recognized in public while inspiring new talents to come through.

On the downside, industrialism and connectivity has fueled our materialistic nature and decreased appreciation for harder-to-understand topics. But, despite all that, it has made artists and art better recognized around the world. The future is bright if we see it in the right light!

How to Dress for Interviews at Model Agencies

Your interview is when you set your first impression and more than just getting accepted into the agency, it’s also about the type of modeling jobs you will be awarded. So dress to impress and we are going to give you a few tips on how you can do so.

1. Simplicity is your Mantra.

Simple and presentable is all your clothes need to be. Why? Model agencies want to see your authentic look, which is akin to a canvas for an artist, for the agency. Fancy and elaborate dresses hide your original body look and figure. Stick to solid and preferably dark colors. Most importantly, be comfortable with what you are wearing. Something model agencies are good at telling from your body posture is that how tensed you are. Never show it out, be as relaxed as possible.

2. Avoid makeup, accessories or jewelry

It’s best to not have too much make-up on; just apply a very little amount of foundation or make-up to hide your pimples or some scars. Don’t be afraid of revealing them as agencies would much rather see your natural face than an overly made-up face. Also, you really don’t want them to wipe your face with a cloth or ask you to wash off your makeup that would be a bad sign from the start. Isn’t it? And there is no reason you should be wearing any thick accessories, remove them for the duration of the interview.

The most important thing you need to wear is your confidence. If you can pull off a well-done interview session confidently with minimalistic cosmetics and accessories, it definitely marks you out as someone worth accepting.

3. Avoid overly revealing your body parts

Model agencies want you to sell your style, not your dignity. Never wear something that is over revealing. For example, don’t show too much cleavage. Immediately reject an agency that asks you reveal more than the usual or necessary. Worse of all is nudity; it will indicate the illegitimacy of the agency, because nude modeling is for highly professional and experienced models, never for a new face. Wear properly covered clothing for your own safety as well.

4. Maintain your health and beauty

Days before your interview invest a good amount of time taking care of your skin, hair, and beauty. Moisturize your skin, condition your hair and wash your face regularly. Do get out and get some exercise and make sure you maintain a good figure as you lead up to your interview.

Drink plenty of water, avoid fast food and get plenty of sleep. You might have heard this many times, but leading a healthy lifestyle is of utmost importance in this industry. A healthy lifestyle will naturally lead to a naturally radiant glow on your skin.

All in all, simply be simple. Wear your smile with your confidence. Apart from your dress sense, prepare yourself for the potential questions that might be asked. Whatever your answer, say it confidently. Keep calm and join the modeling world!

Shading Techniques in Art

Shading is the technique of showing tones or values on an object through gradual gradations for it to look ‘solid’ and have a three dimensional effect. Shading techniques allow you to weave layer upon layer of pencil marks to add a convincing form to your line drawing. Shading adds a sense of substance to your subject and produces a convincing tonal relationship. Drawings take on a three dimensional form when shaded properly.

To render shades correctly on drawn objects, the artist must carefully observe the source of light that is striking various values of tones or shades on the drawn objects. After realizing the source of light, the artist must study closely the reflections of the light on areas of the objects to know the lightest and darkest sections. After establishing the endpoints or extremes thus the lightest valued areas as well as the darkest valued areas, the remaining area with a mid-half tone between the two extremes is the middle value.

The tones are adjusted as many times to make it look realistic. It is advised that artists step back periodically to look at the drawing and the subject in a distance to view and adjust the tones accordingly. This would make the values depicted on the drawn objects more realistic. In the rendition of cast shadow, the artist must take note of the light source and the striking or reflection of the light on the objects. If the light is far above, the shorter the shadow is (try checking out your shadow at noon – 12:00PM) whereas the lower the light, the longer the cast shadow will become. The rule is that the darker the shadow, the brighter the light source. As the shadow is drawn further from the object, the lighter it becomes. The shadow takes on the shape of the item it comes from. Notice that to make the shadow, all you have to do is create a triangular shape from the top of the object to the ground and back to the base of the object. According to the light source, make your shadow fit accordingly.

There are various ways of rendering shades on a drawn object. Some of these are:

1. Hatching: This is a shading technique that employs one set of line either vertical, curved or horizontal lines in rendering shades on a drawn object. These lines are drawn beside one another to give the illusion of a value. Depending on the hatching shading effect one want to achieve, the artist may decide to make the individual lines in hatching sets far apart or close together.

2. Cross-hatching: This is a shading technique made by the use of lines that crosses each other at an angle in rendering shades on an object. In cross-hatching, one set of line crosses over (overlaps) another set of line to create a shade on a drawn object.

3. Stippling/Dottilism/Pointillism: This is a shading technique that employs dots or series of points in rendering the shades on an object.

4. Circularism/Squirkling/Scribbling: This is the use of circles, squirkles and scribbles in rendering a shade on an object. When squirkle sets have noticeable spaces between the lines, they work beautifully for shading various textures, such as fuzzy fabrics and curly hair. Squirkles can look like a solid tone when the lines are drawn closely together, and are great for shading lots of different aspects of people, including skin tones.

5. Tonal gradation/smudging: This is the rendering of soft tones on a drawn object and blending the tones together with the thumb, a piece of paper or a soft cloth.

Rendering shades on objects using any marking or drawing tool is an interesting practical exercise in art. However, to achieve successes, artists must learn the rudiments in shading so as to render shade on drawn objects based on the accepted rubrics of art.

4 Things to Consider to Be a Fashion Model

The Haute Couture of modeling is a specific kind modeling that requires a great deal of commitment and passion.

Looks matter

Unlike commercial or advertisement modeling which accepts almost all kinds of models based on their relevance to the marketplace, fashion modeling is almost like an art form that has its own unique standard to meet. Usually a height of above 170cm, waist measurement of 35″-36″ and angular jaw, cheek and collar bones are expected. It is very rare for shorter models to be in fashion modeling, in which case only a very exceptional skin or look will be able to pass through. The sad truth is that either you’re born with it or you are not. There are many options in the modeling world, and not everyone is suited for everything.

Know the Best Modeling Market for You

Your look and style should also consider the market you want to be in. To fit in the demand in the types of high fashion you will be involved will mostly cater to an Asian or West market. The styles are not fixed to solely Asian, but incorporate many types of high fashion including Western trends. For markets like South Asia, modeling is mostly indigenous in nature and will have to adopt the market’s style, in which case it should suit your looks. Because of a rapidly globalizing world, one has to conduct thorough research to be able to identify which market is best for their particular look and style.

Find a good agency

Finding a good agency can never be understated in its importance. Not all agencies cater to fashion modeling and some only provide specific styles. You should seek out for agencies that will be able to provide for a variety of styles. A good agency will also take the time and effort to create a good portfolio for you and market your brand and look well. You should do some research on the top model agencies and the previous models they have helped to develop before you make a finalized decision.

Establish networks and exposure

As you get exposed to various clients throughout your career, aim to establish good contacts through networking and who knows what kind of opportunities may pass by your way. Also make sure to keep constant contact with your bookers or model agents for opportunities in the market. Gain as diverse a range of exposure as possible. Fashion model’ contracts are hard to get, so if you want it you have to be patient and be willing to cooperate with the Booker.

Fashion modeling is a competitive industry that doesn’t suit everyone. It requires much commitment in terms of time and energy and only accepts certain ideal bodies.

5 Things Every Model Must Know About Modeling Jobs

We list several important things a model should know about modeling jobs, which can prove to be useful for any aspiring Model.

Shoots are never as grand as photos

Modeling jobs can occur with complete irrelevance to the day’s weather (E.g. Thick coat in the Sun) as part of the client or photographer’s fashion design. Moreover, a model may have actually, may have to go through numerous outfit changes and must be willing to persevere through the process. Also, certain positions may be very uncomfortable and models may be required to hold the position for a significant amount of time. All these factors don’t make modeling a ride in the park, or a work for just a pretty face. A strong personality and attitude are fundamental attributes.

Panopticon

As a model, especially on an outdoor shoot, you would encounter more than one photographer. People from the public can be using their smartphone to take pictures of you. This becomes a problem when an unglamorous photo is taken and spread around. So make sure even after your photo shoot, you still carry yourself well in public.

Listen and cooperate

It is necessary to be slightly thick-skinned and confident of your body but never argue with your photographer unless there’s an absolute tragedy taking place. This is because they usually have more experience in the field and serve as your mirror during the photo shoots. They are the ones who are able to see the whole picture, as they see you with your background, and there may be good reasons for putting you in an uncomfortable difficult position. Photographers have an immensely difficult job of meeting up to client’s expectation, so always be kind to them, listen to their advice and cooperate.

Bookings are hard

One of the toughest jobs in a modeling agency is that of the Bookers. They have to match models that clients want and are willing to use. As such some models may find it hard to get good job bookings at the start. They may even have to work in exchange for portfolio photographs, experience clocking, and free clothes or sometimes none at all. A sacrifice of time and effort is often necessary to kick start a modeling career. But even if it is a free job treat it like you are being paid. If nothing at all it becomes a good learning experience and a platform for you to develop your skill as a model. So there’s never anything to lose.

Time and energy investment

As mentioned, time and energy are required for modeling jobs. It is definitely possible to juggle modeling with work or studies, but a model should not be arranging many plans on days where there is a photo shoot. If your eyes are droopy or you can’t hold a pose for too long, the photos are definitely not going to be of professional quality. Hence, bear in mind the vibrancy and energy required for modeling.

Illustration Techniques for Designers

There are several techniques or styles of making an illustration. Each of these techniques has its distinctive process and media specially used for creating the illustration. The graphic artist must therefore familiarize himself well with a particular technique before adopting and using it for the production of a graphic design product. Examples of some of the techniques in illustration are:

1. Pen and wash- This illustration technique involves the drawing of the outlines of the illustration in pencil. Ink is used to go over the drawn outlines in pencil. When it is dried, a small quantity of the ink is diluted with water in a lighter tone. Brush is used to apply the paint at the darker areas of the drawing. The painted areas are washed to create various tones to bring out the forms of the illustration. The outlines are made stronger by the use of pen lines. It is used for catalogues, village and market scenes, fashion design magazines, book covers etc.

2. Pen and ink- This is the use of pen and ink to draw the outlines of the drawing and using any of the shading methods to bring out the forms in the drawing. It is used for illustrations in books, newspapers and magazines.

3. Flat colour painting- In this technique, the colours are painted flat with no gradation in tone. The edges of the sections of the painted drawings are sharp and distinct, setting the difference in the various parts of the drawing. It is used for illustrations in story books, road signs, greeting cards etc.

4. Realistic painting- This is the drawing of objects to show great details as they actually appear in nature. It is used for advertisement, fashion magazine and illustrations in books.

5. Silhouette- This is the creating of the outlines of a drawing in pencil and filling the inner part uniformly with black paint or ink. Silhouette drawings do not show details just the outlines that define the objects are shown. They are used for road signs, package symbols, illustrations in fashion magazines etc.

6. Cartooning- This is the creation of humorous or satirical figures with exaggerated forms. This illustration technique is used for illustrating children books, newspapers, magazines etc.

7. Photography- This is the taking of shots of real objects and scenes by the use of a camera. It gives the exact likeness of the objects and scenes. Photographs are used for posters, magazines, newspapers etc.

3D Animation Videos

The definition of 3D animation is, “Animating objects that appear in a three-dimensional space. They can be rotated and moved like real objects. 3D animation is at the heart of games and virtual reality, but it may also be used in presentation graphics to add flair to the visuals.” How did 3D animation come to be?

William Fetter, an American computer graphics art director, is often attributed to being the founder and creator of 3D animation. In 1960, while working for Boeing Aircraft in Wichita Kansas, he coined the term “computer graphics” after creating the first computer model of the human body. This first 3D model is known as “The Boeing Man.” Fetter was the Supervisor of Advanced Design Graphics at Boeing Aircraft. He and his team explored new techniques, using computer graphics, to assist in the design of airplanes.

Being that 3D animation was founded on the grounds of an engineering company, it makes sense that much of the 3D videos that are created are for the engineering industry. 3D animation can show the inner workings of machine or what has not yet been built, the exact thing William Fetter and his team were working on when 3D animation was created.

Besides engineering, there are many other industries that use 3D animation visualizations. Such as, medical, architectural and retail. In the retail industry, many products are hard or confusing to describe, so companies use 3D modeling to explain the functions of the product. This can be extremely helpful for things that cannot be photographed. Such as, microscopic elements or multiple dimensions and angles.

Anything you can imagine, an animator can create. Other industries that commonly use 3D animation include mining, gaming and construction. Fluid simulations are one 3D animation technique that can be used in the previously mentioned industries and many more. 3D fluid simulations can show how the lubrication of a piston aircraft works, or blood flowing through veins or water flowing through the pipes of a building that hasn’t been built yet.

3D animation is a great way to bring to life a product or design that is still on the drawing board. It is also great to use for something that is difficult to explain verbally. 3D animation can make things visible that are normally invisible or hard to understand. Although there are a few industries who commonly use 3D animation, it is now used for much more. 3D animation can be used to describe or show the details of any product, service or function.

5 Tips for Effective Exaggeration

At the heart of successful animation lie 12 principles. One of these is exaggeration, which refers to the act of taking certain elements and stretching them beyond the realm of normal. All animation requires some sort of exaggeration, even animation that strives to be realistic, because it is exaggeration that makes animation come alive, appeal to audiences, and add comedic relief to otherwise intense scenes. Poorly executed exaggeration, however, can detract rather than add to the appeal and impact of an animated work. As a result, effective exaggeration requires careful work by the traditional animation studio. Following are a few tips for successfully using exaggeration in any animated production.

Exaggerate The Most Important Elements.

The first step in creating effective exaggeration is to choose which elements to exaggerate. The key when making this decision is to remember that exaggerated elements will get the most attention from viewers. Therefore, the element you choose will change the way the viewer understands the scene. As a result, you need to choose the elements that are most important for understanding the scene.

For instance, if you are animating a scene in which a character is sailing, you may decide that the waves’ movements are most important and exaggerate those. On the other hand, you may decide that the character’s reaction is most vital, and, therefore, focus on their facial features. In the first instance, the viewer learns about the environment in which the character is sailing, while in the latter, the viewer learns about the personality of the character. Making the right choice will allow you to create exaggeration that contributes to rather than detracts from your work.

Know What Your Goals Are.

Once you decide which elements to exaggerate, you will need to decide how much exaggeration to use. In order to make this decision, you must have a clear idea of what you hope to achieve with the exaggeration. Exaggeration can be used in a number of different ways. For instance, you can use it to add fluid motions that make the animation look more realistic. On the other hand, you can use it to create caricatured movements that add comedy, or that add personality and appeal.

Each of these goals, however, requires a slightly different use of exaggeration. Take, for instance, the sailor discussed above. If you desire a realistic look, you may choose to slightly exaggerate his facial expressions. However, if you wish to interject humor, you may use extreme exaggeration to give him comedic facial expressions. The right choice will be the one that best contributes to your overall goals for the scene.

Retain The Essence of The Exaggerated Elements.

As soon as you decide to exaggerate an element, you are no longer bound by the strict parameters of reality. However, in order for your exaggeration to retain its appeal, it must still have some connection to reality. If it does not, the object or character being exaggerated will become confusing to viewers, who will no longer be able to mesh what they see on the screen with the basic rules of reality to which they are accustomed.

For instance, say you choose to exaggerate the facial features of the character sailing on the boat. If you remove all identifying elements from the face in order to twist it into a complete caricature of fear or surprise, or delight, you will lose the essence of the character design. The viewer will no longer be able to identify or connect with them. As a result, when exaggerating any animated element, a good rule of thumb is to take what is already there as far as expressions, physical features, or emotions, and exaggerate those elements. By doing so, you increase the appeal of the scene for viewers instead of detracting from it.

Create Balance.

Even though viewers of animation expect to see exaggeration and fantasy, they also want to keep one foot in reality. As a result, another key to effective exaggeration is to create balance within the scene. You can do so by only selecting a few elements in each scene to exaggerate. The rest of the elements must remain more natural and realistic. Doing so will avoid an absurd or disturbing look that will leave viewers confused or dismayed with your work.

For instance, if you exaggerate your sailing character’s facial features, you should refrain from exaggerating their other physical features. If you choose to exaggerate the movement of the waves, you may need to refrain from exaggerating the character’s facial features too. With a balanced scene, you draw the viewer’s attention to the elements they need to see, and keep them grounded enough in reality to enjoy the exaggerated elements.

Keep Your Project Appealing.

Finally, when using exaggeration in your animated production, you will need to maintain appeal. Appeal is a fairly subjective, yet crucial, element to animation. It is what makes even a villain a character the viewers will enjoy watching. Making mistakes in the steps discussed above can result in a loss of appeal. For instance, if you use too much exaggeration, viewers will be less likely to enjoy the animated production.

As a result, the last question you must ask yourself is how the exaggeration contributes to the scene’s overall appeal. It may fit all the criteria above, yet detract from the overall entertainment value. On the other hand, you may find that pushing the boundaries a bit yields a bolder look and greater appeal. As a result, exaggeration, as with any element of animation, requires careful crafting in order to achieve the most powerful and appealing work of art possible.

Exaggeration is an effective way to bring your animation to life, whether you are doing video game animation, advertising animation, or a feature length film. By exaggerating the most important elements, knowing what you want to achieve, retaining the essence of the exaggerated elements, creating balance, and keeping your project appealing can help you to create truly effective exaggeration in your animated art.

5 Reasons Why Product Design Requires 3D Modeling

Product designing is an integral phase of any industry. In this phase, designers get to represent their spectacular ideas to the prospective clients and manufacturers. Helping designers in this phase is state-of-the-art method popularly known as 3D modeling. Thanks to the proliferation of animation industry, designers now have multifunctional tools at their disposal that help them to present their designs in a vivid way. Showcasing your products in 3D forms can turn out to be absolutely stunning.

However, if this reason is not good enough for you, then here are five strong reasons that clarify why product designing is in dire need of 3D modeling.

#1 Create Rapid Prototypes

Creating rapid prototypes of products becomes easy with 3D modeling. Often 3D models prove to be beneficial to evaluate certain crucial factors including product details, its manufacturing costs, and designing concept. 3D models of product prototypes can be created either from a handmade drawing or even from a 2D sketch. However, leverage of 3D modeling lies in its ability in allowing designers to create and refine their designs without much hassle.

#2 Get 360-Degree View

The convenience of demonstrating a model from different angles is a huge leverage for designers. This is another perk of 3D modeling. Viewing the product from different angles not only allows people to notice the smallest details but also gives them a fair idea about its production and packaging. The three dimensional 360-degree view turns out to be pretty useful in all stages of production. Users can zoom in on the product and can get better visual expressions of the same; an advantage clearly not found in 2D sketches.

#3 Gripping Animation

A well-animated product will not only ensure success for your marketing campaign but will also help to give your customers a clear-cut idea about its working. Attention-grabbing animation can actually help you to go a long way and with 3D modeling, you can get to show your clients how your product functions.

#4 Perfect Marketing Material

3D models act as perfect marketing materials. Since they are photo-realistic, they can be easily fitted into presentations and commercials. Effective promotion of products can help companies to gain credibility from their customers and with production-ready models that would come easy. Most real-estate companies have already taken advantage of 3D content for promoting their sales.

#5 Precise Specifications

With the help of modern 3D modeling software, designers can now demonstrate the size, shape and other specifications in context to the real product. This almost real scaling of the products allows companies to give nearly-perfect overview of how the finished goods will be to the prospective customers.

5 Common Character Archetypes in Cartoons

Whether we’re looking at Shakespeare or SpongeBob, there are common character archetypes that appear in stories across time and cultures. Archetypes are characterized or classified by the role they serve or their purpose in a story. The classical archetypes of a good story include the protagonist and antagonist, the mentor, the sidekick, and the love interest. Let’s take a closer look at these five archetypes and how animation studios bring them to life.

The Protagonist

This protagonist is the main character in a story, show or movie. In many cases, this character turns out to be the hero. It is usually easy to identify the protagonist because the storyline revolves around them and their lives, problems and internal conflicts. Roughly, in Greek, the word protagonist translates to “player of the first part” or “chief actor.”

Why is a protagonist so important? They aren’t always the heroes; sometimes they are just the focal point in a show or even in an advertisement. A protagonist is typically on the “good side,” and follows a moral compass that many deem good. The protagonist is likely to change throughout a story and that action expresses the theme of a story an animation studio is trying to put out. A protagonist serves as a doorway into an emotional story or an emotional heart. They tend to draw a viewer or reader into the story. The best protagonists are characters that people can relate to. As a viewer, you may have shared hopes, fears or goals with a protagonist.

When we look to animation and some of the most well known protagonists we see characters like Buzz and Woody or Superman. Though heroes in our eyes, protagonists are far from perfect. They hold some type of flaw, whether it be internal or within their environment. The conflict they face then causes them to fight back or fall back from the big obstacle, and the way they choose to react to a situation is how we choose to interpret the character’s qualities.

The Antagonist

Classical forms of storytelling feature a main character known as the protagonist, which we discussed. This character will typically enter the story first. Then enters the antagonist. This character is typically depicted as the “bad guy” or the “villain.” Antagonists are without a doubt entertaining and bring a moral conflict to light, which as a result puts our hero at a fork in a moral road.

These characters serve to teach viewers wrong from right. These characters are an essential component to any story for many reasons. They are the primary opposition for a protagonist. They elicit the protagonist in the story to change their perception and try to live in a less flawed world, no matter who or what they must hurt to attain it.

When an antagonist or a villain in any story is personifying a central conflict, it brings a different element to a story that will benefit it. The pressure an antagonist puts on the protagonist eventually brings forth inner conflicts. These characters typically test their counterpart’s moral compass and commitment to being morally just.

The Sidekick

The role of a sidekick was once referred to as the “close companion.” This role dates back more than a century. Specifically, we have our first literary glimpse at a sidekick in The Epic of Gilgamesh, which features a protagonist-sidekick. The main character seeks not only friendship, but also advice from Enkidu. This character has defined many of the consistent and quality characteristics we seek in a great sidekick in regards to a production of a film, book or television series and more.

Gilgamesh was unarguably the main character. However, the epic reveals that the secondary character, Enkidu, played a smaller but still meaningful role in the story. When Enkidu is killed, Gilgamesh responds aggressively because he has grown close to his friend and confidant. The depth of the reaction Gilgamesh has not only adds depth to him as a character, but also lets the audience know how significant the bond was between the protagonist and sidekick.

Another common trope of the sidekick is to infuse the story with humor. This is especially true of animated characters. Where would Bugs Bunny be without Daffy Duck to set him off? Some may see Daffy as more of an antagonist, but he’s not really out to get Bugs. The two characters play off of each other and add lots of laughs along the way.

Other great sidekicks in time include Dr. Watson and Sancho Panza. These sidekicks perform different roles and functions in support of the main character they assist throughout a storyline. They serve a grander purpose than simply being a companion or assistant. They humanize the characteristics of a protagonist. They are also the character that moves the story.

The Mentor

The mentor is usually a great help for the protagonist in any story. They guard or protect them during a big quest or journey that involves both physically harmful obstacles as well as emotionally harmful obstacles. They can take many forms. Typically we imagine a grey-haired and aged man, but sometimes the mentor can take the most unsuspecting form.

These characters usually provide support and guide their “student” toward the right path. Mentors are known for having high morals and standards that can often challenge the student they are looking after. They always find a way to inspire them and push them to aspire for something good.

The Love Interest

This character might often be over-looked, but also plays a very important role in many stories. They are the person with whom the main character falls in love with. They serve, as a catalyst in the journey a protagonist must go through. Depending on the ultimate goal of the protagonist, the person who is their love interest can be of great assistance and motivation, much like a mentor can be.

So the next time you’re watching your favorite cartoons, pay close attention to more than the character design quality. Look into the roles you believe each character plays and their significant contribution to a story line. You’ll find it is hard to have a compelling story without these staple archetypes.